I called John, of JD’s Plumbing on a Saturday afternoon, after the hot-water pipe under the bathroom sink blew-out. John was able to contact his tech, Jimmy, who came right out, at the end of his day and fixed the pipe just in time for our guests to arrive and for Jimmy to get to his grandfather’s birthday dinner! He did not have to come out – his...


Mr. Rooter was the most price competitive of the 3 bids I had on sewer repair. Their initial project kicked off in a timely manner before being dragged down by delays. Eventually the project was "complete" - however no walkthrough or signoff occured. My project manager then quit Mr. Rooter. As the weeks went on I started to get calls asking for final payment, even got 1-2 offers to have people "stop by" to go over my project with me. Nothing materialized. Eventually they mailed me the paperwork and ran my credit card on file.
A representative came to my home because of sewer problem. He told me they don't do septic tanks and that's the problem then tried to charge me $498 for a visit which took only one hour. He only ran the line, but was unable to fix the problem. After I threaten to report them to the Better Business Council, he reduced the fee to $198. Then, he told me to get a membership which we be $298 and I can get 15% off next service. He then told me to call him after the septic company cleans the tank and he will run a jetser for $950, but he would give me a $15 discount. The septic company resolve the issue for $300. Mr. Rooter has already has a bad rating on consumer affairs, but I didn't realize his unethical practices until I called for service.
“Don’t go to the Yellow Pages to find a plumber,” says Berkey’s Bill Stevens. “It’s like guessing lottery numbers. Anyone can make an appealing ad, but that doesn’t mean they are legitimate. In this industry, it’s easy for a plumber who develops a poor reputation to advertise under a different name. They come and go.” Even searching for someone online may end up being a scam using fake reviews. Instead, look for a plumber who is well-established in your community. Check the Better Business Bureau and read customer reviews at sites such as HomeAdvisor, Angie’s List, or Citysearch. Local contractors or plumbing fixture stores can also refer you to a quality plumber, according to Grady Daniel, who owns a plumbing company in Austin, Texas. “Most of these firms won’t work with bad plumbers.” Or simply ask your neighbors for a referral. A trusted plumber that consistently delivers quality service does not remain a secret for very long.
This business does not give any indication of prices over the phone and say they do not "charge by the hour, but by the job". It turns out they have a price list that is fixed for types of jobs, but they won't even give you those prices over the phone. They charge $100 for the call out, although they say it's not a call out fee, but just to protect themselves from no shows. BUT, if you don't accept their quote to do the job, they charge you the $100 anyway. Sounds like a call out fee to me. And since you can't get any indication of what the job will cost before they come out, you're kind of stuck with it even if the quote is ridiculous. Their rates are way over what you would expect for the job. We paid $348 to unblock a drain, a job that took between 60 and 90 minutes. I won't be calling them again.
We called Mr. Rooter because we had a leak from our kitchen sink and they responded quickly to my surprise. Mike Farnsworth shows up and gets right to work and doesn't give us an estimate for the work before he started. He ended up replacing a broken pipe in our basement that took 15 minutes and he plunged our tub and sink as well. He wasn't even here for an hour and he charged us $650 dollars! We refused to pay that much because it wasn't reasonable, so he took us to court and he ended up lying in front of a magistrate claiming he worked for 2 hours and did all these repairs, even though after he had left the sink was still leaking and the drains did not work at all!

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